Vicodin HP

Name: Vicodin HP

Description

Hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen is supplied in tablet form for oral administration. Hydrocodone bitartrate is an opioid analgesic and antitussive and occurs as fine, white crystals or as a crystalline powder. It is affected by light. The chemical name is 4,5α-epoxy-3-methoxy-17-methylmorphinan-6-one tartrate (1:1) hydrate (2:5).

It has the following structural formula:


C18H21NO3.C4H6O6.2½ H2O           M.W.= 494.50

Acetaminophen, 4'-hydroxyacetanilide, a slightly bitter, white, odorless, crystalline powder, is a non-opiate, non-salicylate analgesic and antipyretic. It has the following structural formula:


C8H9NO2 M.W.= 151.17

Each VICODIN HP (hydrocodone bitrate and acetaminophen tablets) Tablet contains:

Hydrocodone Bitartrate            10 mg
Acetaminophen                         660 mg

In addition each tablet contains the following inactive ingredients: colloidal silicon dioxide, croscarmellose sodium, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, povidone, pregelatinized starch, and stearic acid.

Meets USP Dissolution Test 2.

Clinical pharmacology

Hydrocodone is a semisynthetic narcotic analgesic and antitussive with multiple actions qualitatively similar to those of codeine. Most of these involve the central nervous system and smooth muscle. The precise mechanism of action of hydrocodone and other opiates is not known, although it is believed to relate to the existence of opiate receptors in the central nervous system. In addition to analgesia, narcotics may produce drowsiness, changes in mood and mental clouding.

The analgesic action of acetaminophen involves peripheral influences, but the specific mechanism is as yet undetermined. Antipyretic activity is mediated through hypothalamic heat regulating centers. Acetaminophen inhibits prostaglandin synthetase. Therapeutic doses of acetaminophen have negligible effects on the cardiovascular or respiratory systems; however, toxic doses may cause circulatory failure and rapid, shallow breathing.

Pharmacokinetics

The behavior of the individual components is described below.

Hydrocodone

Following a 10 mg oral dose of hydrocodone administered to five adult male subjects, the mean peak concentration was 23.6 ± 5.2ng/mL. Maximum serum levels were achieved at 1.3 ± 0.3 hours and the half-life was determined to be 3.8 ± 0.3 hours. Hydrocodone exhibits a complex pattern of metabolism including O-demethylation, N-demethylation and 6-keto reduction to the corresponding 6-α- and 6-β- hydroxy- metabolites. See OVERDOSAGE for toxicity information.

Acetaminophen

Acetaminophen is rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and is distributed throughout most body tissues. The plasma half-life is 1.25 to 3 hours, but may be increased by liver damage and following overdosage. Elimination of acetaminophen is principally by liver metabolism (conjugation) and subsequent renal excretion of metabolites. Approximately 85% of an oral dose appears in the urine within 24 hours of administration, most as the glucuronide conjugate, with small amounts of other conjugates and unchanged drug. See OVERDOSAGE for toxicity information.

  • Liver Disease
  • Pain Management Medication Types

Before Using Vicodin HP

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of hydrocodone and acetaminophen capsules and tablets in the pediatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated pediatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of hydrocodone and acetaminophen oral solution in children. However, safety and efficacy have not been established in children younger than 2 years of age.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of hydrocodone and acetaminophen combination in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have confusion and drowsiness, and age-related liver, kidney, or heart problems, which may require caution and an adjustment in the dose for patients receiving hydrocodone and acetaminophen combination in order to avoid potentially serious side effects.

Pregnancy

Pregnancy Category Explanation
All Trimesters C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women.

Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

  • Nalmefene
  • Naltrexone
  • Safinamide

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Acepromazine
  • Alfentanil
  • Almotriptan
  • Alprazolam
  • Amineptine
  • Amisulpride
  • Amitriptyline
  • Amitriptylinoxide
  • Amobarbital
  • Amoxapine
  • Amphetamine
  • Anileridine
  • Aprepitant
  • Aripiprazole
  • Asenapine
  • Atazanavir
  • Baclofen
  • Benperidol
  • Benzphetamine
  • Boceprevir
  • Bromazepam
  • Bromopride
  • Brompheniramine
  • Buprenorphine
  • Buspirone
  • Butabarbital
  • Butorphanol
  • Carbinoxamine
  • Carisoprodol
  • Carphenazine
  • Ceritinib
  • Chloral Hydrate
  • Chlordiazepoxide
  • Chlorpheniramine
  • Chlorpromazine
  • Chlorzoxazone
  • Citalopram
  • Clarithromycin
  • Clobazam
  • Clomipramine
  • Clonazepam
  • Clorazepate
  • Clozapine
  • Cocaine
  • Codeine
  • Conivaptan
  • Cyclobenzaprine
  • Dasabuvir
  • Desipramine
  • Desmopressin
  • Desvenlafaxine
  • Dexmedetomidine
  • Dextroamphetamine
  • Dextromethorphan
  • Dezocine
  • Diazepam
  • Dibenzepin
  • Dichloralphenazone
  • Difenoxin
  • Dihydrocodeine
  • Diltiazem
  • Diphenhydramine
  • Diphenoxylate
  • Dolasetron
  • Donepezil
  • Doxepin
  • Doxylamine
  • Dronedarone
  • Droperidol
  • Duloxetine
  • Eletriptan
  • Enflurane
  • Erythromycin
  • Escitalopram
  • Estazolam
  • Eszopiclone
  • Ethchlorvynol
  • Ethopropazine
  • Ethylmorphine
  • Fentanyl
  • Flibanserin
  • Fluconazole
  • Fluoxetine
  • Fluphenazine
  • Flurazepam
  • Fluspirilene
  • Fluvoxamine
  • Fosaprepitant
  • Fospropofol
  • Frovatriptan
  • Furazolidone
  • Granisetron
  • Halazepam
  • Haloperidol
  • Halothane
  • Hexobarbital
  • Hydromorphone
  • Hydroxytryptophan
  • Hydroxyzine
  • Idelalisib
  • Imatinib
  • Imipramine
  • Indinavir
  • Iproniazid
  • Isocarboxazid
  • Isoflurane
  • Isoniazid
  • Itraconazole
  • Ketamine
  • Ketazolam
  • Ketobemidone
  • Ketoconazole
  • Levomilnacipran
  • Levorphanol
  • Linezolid
  • Lisdexamfetamine
  • Lithium
  • Lofepramine
  • Lopinavir
  • Lorazepam
  • Lorcaserin
  • Loxapine
  • Meclizine
  • Melitracen
  • Melperone
  • Meperidine
  • Mephobarbital
  • Meprobamate
  • Meptazinol
  • Mesoridazine
  • Metaxalone
  • Methadone
  • Methamphetamine
  • Methdilazine
  • Methocarbamol
  • Methohexital
  • Methotrimeprazine
  • Methylene Blue
  • Midazolam
  • Milnacipran
  • Mirtazapine
  • Moclobemide
  • Molindone
  • Moricizine
  • Morphine
  • Morphine Sulfate Liposome
  • Nalbuphine
  • Naratriptan
  • Nefazodone
  • Nelfinavir
  • Netupitant
  • Nialamide
  • Nicomorphine
  • Nitrazepam
  • Nitrous Oxide
  • Nortriptyline
  • Olanzapine
  • Ombitasvir
  • Ondansetron
  • Opipramol
  • Opium
  • Opium Alkaloids
  • Orphenadrine
  • Oxazepam
  • Oxycodone
  • Oxymorphone
  • Palonosetron
  • Papaveretum
  • Paregoric
  • Paritaprevir
  • Paroxetine
  • Pentazocine
  • Pentobarbital
  • Perampanel
  • Perazine
  • Periciazine
  • Perphenazine
  • Phenelzine
  • Phenobarbital
  • Piperacetazine
  • Pipotiazine
  • Piritramide
  • Pixantrone
  • Pneumococcal 13-Valent Vaccine, Diphtheria Conjugate
  • Posaconazole
  • Prazepam
  • Primidone
  • Procarbazine
  • Prochlorperazine
  • Promazine
  • Promethazine
  • Propofol
  • Protriptyline
  • Quazepam
  • Quetiapine
  • Ramelteon
  • Rasagiline
  • Remifentanil
  • Remoxipride
  • Ritonavir
  • Rizatriptan
  • Saquinavir
  • Secobarbital
  • Selegiline
  • Sertindole
  • Sertraline
  • Sibutramine
  • Sodium Oxybate
  • Sufentanil
  • Sulpiride
  • Sumatriptan
  • Suvorexant
  • Tapentadol
  • Telaprevir
  • Telithromycin
  • Temazepam
  • Thiethylperazine
  • Thiopental
  • Thiopropazate
  • Thioridazine
  • Tianeptine
  • Tilidine
  • Tizanidine
  • Tolonium Chloride
  • Topiramate
  • Tramadol
  • Tranylcypromine
  • Trazodone
  • Triazolam
  • Trifluoperazine
  • Trifluperidol
  • Triflupromazine
  • Trimeprazine
  • Trimipramine
  • Tryptophan
  • Venlafaxine
  • Verapamil
  • Vilazodone
  • Voriconazole
  • Vortioxetine
  • Zaleplon
  • Ziprasidone
  • Zolmitriptan
  • Zolpidem
  • Zopiclone
  • Zotepine

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Acenocoumarol
  • Carbamazepine
  • Fosphenytoin
  • Lixisenatide
  • Phenytoin
  • Warfarin
  • Zidovudine

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following is usually not recommended, but may be unavoidable in some cases. If used together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use this medicine, or give you special instructions about the use of food, alcohol, or tobacco.

  • Ethanol
  • Grapefruit Juice
  • Tobacco

Using this medicine with any of the following may cause an increased risk of certain side effects but may be unavoidable in some cases. If used together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use this medicine, or give you special instructions about the use of food, alcohol, or tobacco.

  • Cabbage

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Addison's disease (adrenal gland problem) or
  • Alcohol abuse, history of or
  • Brain tumor, or history of or
  • Breathing or lung problems (eg, asthma, apnea, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD], cor pulmonale, emphysema, hypoxia) or
  • CNS depression or
  • Drug dependence, especially narcotic abuse or dependence, or history of or
  • Enlarged prostate (BPH, prostatic hypertrophy) or
  • Head injuries, or history of or
  • Increased pressure in the head or
  • Hypothyroidism (an underactive thyroid) or
  • Problems with passing urine—Use with caution. May increase risk for more serious side effects.
  • Hypotension (low blood pressure) or
  • Pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas) or
  • Seizures, history of—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse.
  • Kidney disease or
  • Liver disease—Use with caution. The effects may be increased because of slower removal of the medicine from the body.
  • Lung disease or breathing problems, severe or
  • Stomach or bowel blockage—Should not be used in patients with these conditions.

Vicodin HP Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common
  • Dizziness
  • lightheadedness
Incidence not known
  • Back, leg, or stomach pains
  • black, tarry stools
  • bleeding gums
  • blood in the urine or stools
  • blood in vomit
  • bluish lips or skin
  • chills
  • choking
  • cough or hoarseness
  • dark urine
  • decrease in the frequency of urination
  • decrease in urine volume
  • difficult or troubled breathing
  • difficulty in passing urine (dribbling)
  • difficulty with breathing
  • difficulty with swallowing
  • fast heartbeat
  • fever
  • fever with or without chills
  • general body swelling
  • general feeling of tiredness or weakness
  • headache
  • irregular, fast or slow, or shallow breathing
  • light-colored stools
  • loss of appetite
  • lower back or side pain
  • nausea or vomiting
  • nosebleeds
  • not breathing
  • painful or difficult urination
  • pale or blue lips, fingernails, or skin
  • pinpoint red spots on the skin
  • puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue
  • severe or continuing stomach pain
  • skin rash, hives, or itching
  • sore throat
  • sore tongue
  • sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or in the mouth
  • tightness in the chest
  • unable to speak
  • unusual bleeding or bruising
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
  • upper right abdominal or stomach pain
  • yellow eyes and skin

Get emergency help immediately if any of the following symptoms of overdose occur:

Symptoms of overdose
  • Bloody or cloudy urine
  • change in consciousness
  • chest pain or discomfort
  • cold and clammy skin
  • decreased awareness or responsiveness
  • extreme drowsiness
  • general feeling of discomfort or illness
  • increased sweating
  • irregular heartbeat
  • lightheadedness, dizziness, or fainting
  • loss of consciousness
  • no blood pressure or pulse
  • no muscle tone or movement
  • not breathing
  • severe sleepiness
  • slow or irregular heartbeat
  • stopping of heart
  • sudden decrease in the amount of urine
  • unconsciousness
  • unpleasant breath odor

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common
  • Drowsiness
  • relaxed and calm
  • sleepiness
Incidence not known
  • Belching
  • changes in mood
  • difficulty having a bowel movement (stool)
  • fear or nervousness
  • feeling of indigestion
  • hearing loss
  • impaired hearing
  • pain in the chest below the breastbone
  • unusual drowsiness, dullness, tiredness, weakness, or feeling of sluggishness

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Adverse Reactions

The following adverse reactions have been identified during post approval use of hydrocodone and acetaminophen tablets. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

The most frequently reported adverse reactions are light-headedness, dizziness, sedation, nausea and vomiting.

Other adverse reactions include:

Central Nervous System: Drowsiness, mental clouding, lethargy, impairment of mental and physical performance, anxiety, fear, dysphoria, psychological dependence, mood changes.

Gastrointestinal System: Constipation.

Genitourinary System: Ureteral spasm, spasm of vesical sphincters, and urinary retention.

Special Senses: Cases of hearing impairment or permanent loss have been reported predominately in patients with chronic overdose.

Dermatological: Skin rash, pruritus, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, allergic reactions.

Hematological: Thrombocytopenia, agranulocytosis.

• Serotonin syndrome: Cases of serotonin syndrome, a potentially life-threatening condition, have been reported during concomitant use of opioids with serotonergic drugs. • Adrenal insufficiency: Cases of adrenal insufficiency have been reported with opioid use, more often following greater than one month of use. • Anaphylaxis: Anaphylaxis has been reported with ingredients contained in hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets. • Androgen deficiency: Cases of androgen deficiency have occurred with chronic use of opioids [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY].

Drug Abuse and Dependence

Controlled Substance

Hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets contain hydrocodone, a Schedule II controlled substance.

Abuse

Hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets contain hydrocodone, a substance with a high potential for abuse similar to other opioids, including fentanyl, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, oxycodone, oxymorphone, and tapentadol, can be abused and are subject to misuse, addiction, and criminal diversion [see WARNINGS].

All patients treated with opioids require careful monitoring for signs of abuse and addiction, because use of opioid analgesic products carries the risk of addiction even under appropriate medical use.

Prescription drug abuse is the intentional non-therapeutic use of a prescription drug, even once, for its rewarding psychological or physiological effects.

Drug addiction is a cluster of behavioral, cognitive, and physiological phenomena that develop after repeated substance use and includes a strong desire to take the drug, difficulties in controlling its use, persisting in its use despite harmful consequences, a higher priority given to drug use than to other activities and obligations, increased tolerance, and sometimes a physical withdrawal.

“Drug-seeking” behavior is very common in persons with substance use disorders. Drug-seeking tactics include emergency calls or visits near the end of office hours, refusal to undergo appropriate examination, testing, or referral, repeated “loss” of prescriptions, tampering with prescriptions and reluctance to provide prior medical records or contact information for other treating healthcare provider(s). “Doctor shopping” (visiting multiple prescribers to obtain additional prescriptions) is common among drug abusers and people suffering from untreated addiction. Preoccupation with achieving adequate pain relief can be appropriate behavior in a patient with poor pain control.

Abuse and addiction are separate and distinct from physical dependence and tolerance. Health care providers should be aware that addiction may not be accompanied by concurrent tolerance and symptoms of physical dependence in all addicts. In addition, abuse of opioids can occur in the absence of true addiction.

Hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets, like other opioids, can be diverted for non-medical use into illicit channels of distribution. Careful record-keeping of prescribing information, including quantity, frequency, and renewal requests, as required by state and federal law, is strongly advised.

Proper assessment of the patient, proper prescribing practices, periodic re-evaluation of therapy, and proper dispensing and storage are appropriate measures that help to limit abuse of opioid drugs.

Risks Specific to Abuse of HydrocodoneBitartrate and Acetaminophen Tablets

Hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets are for oral use only. Hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets pose a risk of overdose and death. The risk is increased with concurrent abuse of hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets with alcohol and other central nervous system depressants.

Parenteral drug abuse is commonly associated with transmission of infectious diseases such as hepatitis and HIV.

Dependence

Both tolerance and physical dependence can develop during chronic opioid therapy. Tolerance is the need for increasing doses of opioids to maintain a defined effect such as analgesia (in the absence of disease progression or other external factors). Tolerance may occur to both the desired and undesired effects of drugs, and may develop at different rates for different effects.

Physical dependence results in withdrawal symptoms after abrupt discontinuation or a significant dosage reduction of a drug. Withdrawal also may be precipitated through the administration of drugs with opioid antagonist activity (e.g., naloxone, nalmefene), mixed agonist/antagonist analgesics (e.g., pentazocine, butorphanol, nalbuphine), or partial agonists (e.g., buprenorphine). Physical dependence may not occur to a clinically significant degree until after several days to weeks of continued opioid usage.

Hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets should not be abruptly discontinued in a physically dependent patient [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION]. If hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets are abruptly discontinued in a physically dependent patient, a withdrawal syndrome may occur. Some or all of the following can characterize this syndrome: restlessness, lacrimation, rhinorrhea, yawning, perspiration, chills, myalgia, and mydriasis. Other signs and symptoms also may develop, including: irritability, anxiety, backache, joint pain, weakness, abdominal cramps, insomnia, nausea, anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea, or increased blood pressure, respiratory rate, or heart rate.

Infants born to mothers physically dependent on opioids will also be physically dependent and may exhibit respiratory difficulties and withdrawal signs [see PRECAUTIONS; Pregnancy].

Overdosage

Following an acute overdosage, toxicity may result from hydrocodone or acetaminophen.

Clinical Presentation

Acute overdosage with hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets can be manifested by respiratory depression, somnolence progressing to stupor or coma, skeletal muscle flaccidity, cold and clammy skin, constricted pupils, and, in some cases, pulmonary edema, bradycardia, hypotension, partial or complete airway obstruction, atypical snoring, and death. Marked mydriasis rather than miosis may be seen with hypoxia in overdose situations.

Acetaminophen

Dose-dependent, potentially fatal hepatic necrosis is the most serious adverse effect of acetaminophen overdosage. Renal tubular necrosis, hypoglycemic coma and coagulation defects may also occur.

Early symptoms following a potentially hepatotoxic overdose may include: nausea, vomiting, diaphoresis and general malaise. Clinical and laboratory evidence of hepatic toxicity may not be apparent until 48 to 72 hours post-ingestion.

Treatment of Overdose

Hydrocodone

In case of overdose, priorities are the re-establishment of a patent and protected airway and institution of assisted or controlled ventilation, if needed. Employ other supportive measures (including oxygen and vasopressors) in the management of circulatory shock and pulmonary edema as indicated. Cardiac arrest or arrhythmias will require advanced life-support techniques.

The opioid antagonists, naloxone or nalmefene, are specific antidotes to respiratory depression resulting from opioid overdose. For clinically significant respiratory or circulatory depression secondary to hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets overdose, administer an opioid antagonist. Opioid antagonists should not be administered in the absence of clinically significant respiratory or circulatory depression secondary to hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets overdose.

Because the duration of opioid reversal is expected to be less than the duration of action of hydrocodone in hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets, carefully monitor the patient until spontaneous respiration is reliably reestablished. If the response to an opioid antagonist is suboptimal or only brief in nature, administer additional antagonist as directed by the product’s prescribing information.

In an individual physically dependent on opioids, administration of the recommended usual dosage of the antagonist will precipitate an acute withdrawal syndrome. The severity of the withdrawal symptoms experienced will depend on the degree of physical dependence and the dose of the antagonist administered. If a decision is made to treat serious respiratory depression in the physically dependent patient, administration of the antagonist should be initiated with care and by titration with smaller than usual doses of the antagonist.

Acetaminophen

Gastric decontamination with activated charcoal should be administered just prior to N-acetylcysteine (NAC) to decrease systemic absorption if acetaminophen ingestion is known or suspected to have occurred within a few hours of presentation. Serum acetaminophen levels should be obtained immediately if the patient presents 4 hours or more after ingestion to assess potential risk of hepatotoxicity; acetaminophen levels drawn less than 4 hours post-ingestion may be misleading. To obtain the best possible outcome, NAC should be administered as soon as possible where impending or evolving liver injury is suspected. Intravenous NAC may be administered when circumstances preclude oral administration.

Vigorous supportive therapy is required in severe intoxication. Procedures to limit the continuing absorption of the drug must be readily performed since the hepatic injury is dose dependent and occurs early in the course of intoxication.

How is Vicodin HP Supplied

VICODIN®, VICODIN ES®, and Vicodin HP® (Hydrocodone Bitartrate and Acetaminophen) Tablets, USP are supplied as:

VICODIN® 5 mg/300 mg

White, capsule-shaped, bisected tablets debossed “5” score “300” on one side and “VICODIN” on the other side in bottles of 100 and 500 tablets:

Bottles of 100 - NDC 0074-3041-13

Bottles of 500 - NDC 0074-3041-53

VICODIN ES® 7.5 mg/300 mg

White, capsule-shaped, bisected tablets debossed “7.5” score “300” on one side and “VICODIN ES” on the other side in bottles of 100 and 500 tablets:

Bottles of 100 - NDC 0074-3043-13

Bottles of 500 - NDC 0074-3043-53

Vicodin HP® 10 mg/300 mg

White, capsule-shaped, bisected tablets debossed “10” score “300” on one side and “Vicodin HP” on the other side in bottles of 100 and 500 tablets:

Bottles of 100 - NDC 0074-3054-13

Bottles of 500 - NDC 0074-3054-53

Store at 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature].

Dispense in a tight, light-resistant container as defined in the USP with a child-resistant closure.

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to acetaminophen / hydrocodone: oral capsule, oral elixir, oral liquid, oral solution, oral tablet

General

The adverse effects of hydrocodone are generally similar to the adverse effects observed with other narcotic analgesics. Acetaminophen is generally well-tolerated when administered in therapeutic doses.[Ref]

Nervous system

One study has suggested that the respiratory depression caused by hydrocodone may be of benefit in the treatment of dyspnea related to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and restrictive lung disease. However, the potential for the precipitation of respiratory insufficiency makes such use of hydrocodone hazardous and such use should be undertaken, if at all, only with extreme caution.[Ref]

Nervous system side effects of hydrocodone include mental depression, dizziness, lightheadedness, respiratory depression (which is sometimes fatal), stupor, delirium, somnolence, agitation, and dysphoria.[Ref]

Other

Other side effects have included withdrawal symptoms, after either abrupt cessation or fast tapering of narcotic analgesics. Such symptoms may include agitation, restlessness, anxiety, insomnia, tremor, abdominal cramps, blurred vision, vomiting, and sweating.[Ref]

Hepatic

Alcoholic patients may develop hepatotoxicity after even modest doses of acetaminophen. In healthy patients, approximately 15 grams of acetaminophen is necessary to deplete liver glutathione stores by 70% in a 70 kg person. However, hepatotoxicity has been reported following smaller doses. Glutathione concentrations may be repleted by the antidote N-acetylcysteine. One case report has suggested that hypothermia may also be beneficial in decreasing liver damage during overdose.

In a recent retrospective study of 306 patients admitted for acetaminophen overdose, 6.9% had severe liver injury but all recovered. None of the 306 patients died.

A 19-year-old female developed hepatotoxicity, reactive plasmacytosis and agranulocytosis followed by a leukemoid reaction after acute acetaminophen toxicity.

The adverse effects of hydrocodone may be more likely and more severe in patients with liver disease.[Ref]

Hepatic side effects including severe and sometimes fatal dose dependent hepatitis have been reported in alcoholic patients. Hepatotoxicity has been increased during fasting. Several cases of hepatotoxicity from chronic acetaminophen therapy at therapeutic doses have also been reported despite a lack of risk factors for toxicity.[Ref]

Gastrointestinal

Gastrointestinal side effects with the use of acetaminophen are rare except in alcoholics and after overdose. Cases of acute pancreatitis have been reported rarely.

Gastrointestinal side effect including nausea, vomiting, constipation, and dry mouth are relatively common effects of narcotic analgesics.[Ref]

One study has suggested that acetaminophen may precipitate acute biliary pain and cholestasis. The mechanism of this effect may be related to inhibition of prostaglandin and alterations in the regulation of the sphincter of Oddi.[Ref]

Genitourinary

Genitourinary side effects including ureteral spasm, spasm of vesicle sphincters, and urinary retention have been reported.[Ref]

Dermatologic

Dermatologic side effects including narcotic-induced rashes have been reported. General erythematous skin rashes associated with acetaminophen have been reported, but are rare. A rare case of bullous erythema associated with acetaminophen has been reported. Acetaminophen has been associated with a risk of rare but potentially fatal serious skin reactions know as Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP).[Ref]

Renal

Acute tubular necrosis usually occurs in conjunction with liver failure, but has been observed as an isolated finding in rare cases.

The adverse effects of hydrocodone may be more likely and more severe in patients with renal insufficiency.[Ref]

Renal side effects of acetaminophen are rare and include acute tubular necrosis and interstitial nephritis. Adverse renal effects are most often observed after overdose, from chronic abuse (often with multiple analgesics), or in association with acetaminophen-related hepatotoxicity.[Ref]

Hematologic

Hematologic side effects including rare cases of thrombocytopenia associated with acetaminophen have been reported. Acute thrombocytopenia has also been reported as having been caused by sensitivity to acetaminophen glucuronide, the major metabolite of acetaminophen. Methemoglobinemia with resulting cyanosis has also been observed in the setting of acute overdose.[Ref]

Hypersensitivity

Hypersensitivity side effects to acetaminophen have been reported rarely.[Ref]

Respiratory

Respiratory side effects have included a case of eosinophilic pneumonia which has been associated with acetaminophen.[Ref]

Metabolic

In the case of metabolic acidosis, causality is uncertain as more than one drug was ingested. The case of metabolic acidosis followed the ingestion of 75 grams of acetaminophen, 1.95 grams of aspirin, and a small amount of a liquid household cleaner. The patient also had a history of seizures which the authors reported may have contributed to an increased lactate level indicative of metabolic acidosis.

Metabolic side effects including metabolic acidosis have been reported following a massive overdose of acetaminophen.

Some side effects of Vicodin HP may not be reported. Always consult your doctor or healthcare specialist for medical advice. You may also report side effects to the FDA.

(web3)