Triamcot Injection

Name: Triamcot Injection

Uses For Triamcot

Triamcinolone injection is used to treat inflammation (swelling), allergic reactions, certain types of arthritis, gout, skin diseases, and many other medical problems. It is given to patients who are not able to take medicines by the mouth. This medicine is a corticosteroid (cortisone-like medicine or steroid).

This medicine is to be administered only by or under the immediate supervision of your doctor.

Before Using Triamcot

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated pediatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of triamcinolone injection in the pediatric population. However, because of this medicine's toxicity, it should be used with caution especially in premature babies.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of triamcinolone injection in the elderly.

Pregnancy

Pregnancy Category Explanation
All Trimesters C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women.

Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are receiving this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

  • Desmopressin
  • Rotavirus Vaccine, Live

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Aldesleukin
  • Bemiparin
  • Ceritinib
  • Idelalisib
  • Nadroparin
  • Pixantrone
  • Ritonavir

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Alcuronium
  • Aspirin
  • Atracurium
  • Fosphenytoin
  • Gallamine
  • Hexafluorenium
  • Licorice
  • Metocurine
  • Phenytoin
  • Primidone
  • Saiboku-To

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Bone problems (e.g., osteoporosis) or
  • Cataracts or
  • Cirrhosis (liver problem) or
  • Congestive heart failure or
  • Depression or
  • Emotional problems or
  • Glaucoma or
  • Heart attack, recent or
  • Heart disease or
  • Hypertension (high blood pressure) or
  • Intracranial hypertension (increased pressure in the head) or
  • Kaposi's sarcoma or
  • Kidney disease, severe or
  • Mental illness or
  • Myasthenia gravis (severe muscle weakness) or
  • Stomach or bowel problems (e.g., diverticulitis, ulcers, ulcerative colitis) or
  • Thyroid problems—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse.
  • Brain injury, traumatic or
  • Cerebral malaria or
  • Herpes infection of the eye or
  • Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (low platelet count)—Should not be used in patients with this condition.
  • Infection (bacteria, virus, fungus, parasite, or protozoa)—May decrease your body's ability to fight infection.
  • Tuberculosis infection, inactive—Should be treated first before starting therapy with this medicine.

Precautions

Consult your pharmacist.

Interactions

Consult your pharmacist.

Keep a list of all your medications with you, and share the list with your doctor and pharmacist.

Overdose

If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center.

Notes

No monograph available at this time.

Missed Dose

Consult your pharmacist.

Storage

Consult your pharmacist.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company for more details about how to safely discard your product.

Information last revised July 2016. Copyright(c) 2016 First Databank, Inc.

For the Consumer

Applies to triamcinolone: injection suspension

Along with its needed effects, triamcinolone (the active ingredient contained in Triamcot) may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor or nurse immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking triamcinolone:

More common
  • Aggression
  • agitation
  • anxiety
  • blurred vision
  • decrease in the amount of urine
  • dizziness
  • fast, slow, pounding, or irregular heartbeat or pulse
  • headache
  • irritability
  • mental depression
  • mood changes
  • nervousness
  • noisy, rattling breathing
  • numbness or tingling in the arms or legs
  • pounding in the ears
  • shortness of breath
  • swelling of the fingers, hands, feet, or lower legs
  • trouble thinking, speaking, or walking
  • troubled breathing at rest
  • weight gain
Incidence not known
  • Abdominal cramping and/or burning (severe)
  • abdominal pain
  • backache
  • bloody, black, or tarry stools
  • cough or hoarseness
  • darkening of skin
  • decreased vision
  • diarrhea
  • dry mouth
  • eye pain
  • eye tearing
  • facial hair growth in females
  • fainting
  • fatigue
  • fever or chills
  • flushed, dry skin
  • fractures
  • fruit-like breath odor
  • full or round face, neck, or trunk
  • heartburn and/or indigestion (severe and continuous)
  • increased hunger
  • increased thirst
  • increased urination
  • loss of appetite
  • loss of sexual desire or ability
  • lower back or side pain
  • menstrual irregularities
  • muscle pain or tenderness
  • muscle wasting or weakness
  • nausea
  • pain in back, ribs, arms, or legs
  • painful or difficult urination
  • skin rash
  • sleeplessness
  • sweating
  • trouble healing
  • trouble sleeping
  • unexplained weight loss
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
  • vision changes
  • vomiting
  • vomiting of material that looks like coffee grounds

Some side effects of triamcinolone may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Incidence not known
  • Blemishes on the skin
  • bruising
  • dry, scaly skin
  • feeling of constant movement of self or surroundings
  • full or bloated feeling
  • increased appetite
  • increased hair growth on the face, forehead, back, arms, and legs
  • large, flat, blue, or purplish patches in the skin
  • pimples
  • pitting or depression of the skin at the injection site
  • reddish purple lines on the arms, face, legs, trunk, or groin
  • redness of the skin
  • redness, swelling, tenderness, or pain at the injection site
  • sensation of spinning
  • small, red, or purple spots on the skin
  • thin, fragile, or shiny skin
  • thinning of the scalp hair

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