Thioxanthene (Oral Route, Parenteral Route)

Name: Thioxanthene (Oral Route, Parenteral Route)

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to medicines in this group or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pregnancy

Studies have not been done in pregnant women. Although animal studies have not shown that thioxanthenes cause birth defects, the studies have shown that these medicines cause a decrease in fertility and fewer successful pregnancies.

Breastfeeding

It is not known if thioxanthenes pass into the breast milk. However, similar medicines for nervous, mental, or emotional conditions do pass into breast milk and may cause drowsiness and increase the risk of other problems in the nursing baby. Be sure you have discussed the risks and benefits of this medicine with your doctor.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of medicines in this class. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Alcohol abuse—Drinking alcohol will add to the central nervous system (CNS) depressant effects of thioxanthenes.
  • Blood disease or
  • Enlarged prostate or
  • Glaucoma or
  • Heart or blood vessel disease or
  • Lung disease or
  • Parkinson's disease or
  • Stomach ulcers or
  • Urination problems—Thioxanthenes may make the condition worse.
  • Liver disease—Higher blood levels of thioxanthenes may occur, increasing the chance of side effects.
  • Reye's syndrome—The risk of liver problems may be increased.
  • Seizure disorders—The risk of seizures may be increased.

Dosing

The dose medicines in this class will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of these medicines. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For chlorprothixene

  • For treatment of psychosis:
    • For oral dosage forms (suspension or tablets):
      • Adults and teenagers—25 to 50 milligrams (mg) three or four times a day.
      • Children 6 to 12 years of age—10 to 25 mg three or four times a day.
      • Children up to 6 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For injection dosage form:
      • Adults and teenagers—25 to 50 mg, injected into a muscle, three or four times a day.
      • Children up to 12 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For flupenthixol

  • For treatment of psychosis:
    • For oral dosage form (tablets):
      • Adults—To start, 1 milligram (mg) three times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed, depending on your condition.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For long-acting injection dosage form:
      • Adults—To start, 20 to 40 milligrams (mg) injected into a muscle. Your doctor will determine whether your dose needs to be changed, depending on your condition.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For thiothixene

  • For treatment of psychosis:
    • For oral dosage forms (capsules and solution):
      • Adults and teenagers—To start, 2 milligrams (mg) three times a day, or 5 mg two times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 60 mg a day.
      • Children up to 12 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For injection dosage form:
      • Adults and teenagers—4 milligrams (mg), injected into a muscle, two to four times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 30 mg a day.
      • Children up to 12 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
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