Memantine Oral Tablet

Name: Memantine Oral Tablet

Highlights for memantine

Memantine is an oral drug that’s used to treat moderate to severe dementia caused by Alzheimer’s disease.

Your dose depends on the form of the drug you’re taking and other health conditions that you have. Your doctor will decide a dose that’s right for you.

Common side effects include dizziness, headaches, constipation, and confusion.

This drug may raise your risk of seizures. Tell your doctor if you’re taking any medications for seizures.

Certain medications (carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and sodium bicarbonate) can increase in the pH level of your urine. This increases the level of memantine in your blood and leads to more side effects.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION
  • Seizures warning See Details

  • Kidney/Liver problems dosage See Details

Drug features

This drug is a prescription drug. It’s available in these forms: immediate-release tablet, oral solution, and extended-release capsule.

All forms of memantine are available as generic drugs. Generic drugs usually cost less than the brand-name version.

This drug may be used as part of a combination therapy. That means you need to take it with other drugs to treat dementia associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

Why it's used

This drug is used to treat moderate to severe dementia in adults with Alzheimer’s disease.

How it works

This drug belongs to a class of drugs called NMDA receptor antagonists.

More Details

Memantine Side Effects

Most Common Side Effects

The most common side effects that occur with memantine include:

  • dizziness

  • headache

  • confusion

  • constipation

If these effects are mild, they may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. If they’re more severe or don’t go away, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Serious Side Effects

If you experience any of these serious side effects, call your doctor right away. If your symptoms are potentially life threatening, or if you think you’re experiencing a medical emergency, call 9-1-1.

  • allergic reaction. Symptoms may include:

    • swelling of your tongue, lips, or face
    • shortness of breath
    • skin rash
    • hives
  • seizures or convulsions

  • inflammation of the liver (hepatitis). Symptoms may include:

    • yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes
  • inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis). Symptoms may include:

    • severe nausea
    • severe abdominal pain
  • change in mental health. Symptoms may include:

    • hallucinations
    • thoughts of suicide
  • congestive heart failure. Symptoms may include:

    • shortness of breath
    • swelling in your feet and ankles
Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs affect each person differently, we cannot guarantee that this information includes all possible side effects. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always discuss possible side effects with a healthcare provider who knows your medical history.

Memantine May Interact with Other Medications

This drug can interact with other medications, herbs, or vitamins you might be taking. That’s why your doctor should manage all of your medications carefully. If you’re curious about how this drug might interact with something else you’re taking, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Note: You can reduce your chances of drug interactions by having all of your prescriptions filled at the same pharmacy. That way, a pharmacist can check for possible drug interactions.

Medications That Might Interact with This Drug

Drugs used to treat glaucoma
  • acetazolamide
  • methazolamide

These drugs can increase the amount of memantine in your body. This can lead to more side effects.

Sodium bicarbonate

This drug can increase the amount of memantine in your body. This can lead to more side effects.

Parkinson’s disease medication
  • amantadine

This drug works similarly to memantine. Taking them together may lead to more side effects.

Anesthesia medication
  • ketamine

This drug works similarly to memantine. Taking them together may lead to more side effects.

Cough medication
  • dextromethorphan

This drug works similarly to memantine. Taking them together may lead to more side effects.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs interact differently in each person, we cannot guarantee that this information includes all possible interactions. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always speak with your healthcare provider about possible interactions with all prescription drugs, vitamins, herbs and supplements, and over-the-counter drugs that you are taking. Drug warnings

People with kidney problems

If your kidneys aren’t working well, more of this drug may stay in your body longer. This puts you at greater risk for side effects. If you have severe kidney problems, your doctor may reduce your dose of this drug.

People with liver problems

Tell your doctor if you have a history of severe liver problems. If your liver isn’t working well, more of this drug may stay in your body longer. This puts you at greater risk for side effects.

People with seizure disorders

This drug may increase your risk of having a seizure.

Pregnant women

This drug is a pregnancy category B drug. That means two things:

  1. Studies of the drug in pregnant animals haven’t shown risk to the fetus.
  2. There aren’t enough studies done in pregnant women to show the drug poses a risk to the fetus.

Tell your doctor if you’re pregnant or plan to become pregnant. This drug should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

Women who are breast-feeding

It isn’t known if this drug passes through breast milk. If it does, it may cause serious effects in a breastfeeding child.

Talk to your doctor if you’re currently taking this drug and you’re thinking about breastfeeding.

For seniors

Older adults may process this drug more slowly. A normal adult dose may cause levels of the drug to be higher than normal in your body. You may need a lower dose or a different schedule.

For children

This medicine hasn’t been studied in children and shouldn’t be used in children younger than 18 years old.

Allergies

This drug can cause a severe allergic reaction. Symptoms may include:

  • itching
  • hives
  • rash
  • peeling or blistering skin
  • swelling of your tongue, lips, or face
  • trouble breathing

Don’t take this drug again if you’ve ever had an allergic reaction to it. Taking it again could be fatal.

How to Take memantine (Dosage)

All possible dosages and forms may not be included here. Your dose, form, and how often you take it will depend on:

  • your age
  • the condition being treated
  • how severe your condition is
  • other medical conditions you have
  • how you react to the first dose

What are you taking this medication for?

Alzheimer’s disease

Brand: Namenda

Form: Oral immediate-release tablet Strengths: 5 mg, 10 mg Form: Oral solution Strength: 2mg/mL

Brand: Namenda XR

Form: Oral extended-release capsule Strengths: 7 mg, 14 mg, 21 mg, and 28 mg

Generic: memantine

Form: Oral immediate-release tablet Strengths: 5 mg, 10 mg Form: Oral extended-release capsule Strength: 7 mg, 14 mg, 21 mg, and 28 mg Form: Oral Solution Strength: 2 mg/mL Adult dosage (ages 18 years and older)

Oral immediate-release tablet and oral solution:

  • starting dose: 5 mg taken by mouth one time per day, then it will be increased to twice per day.
  • maximum dose: 20 mg per day

Extended-release capsule:

  • starting dose: 7 mg taken by mouth one time per day.
  • target dose: 28 mg per day.
  • Your doctor will tell you how to increase your dose to reach 28 mg per day.
Child dosage (ages 0-17 years)

This medicine hasn’t been studied in children and shouldn’t be used in children under 18 years old.

Special considerations

Kidney problems: If you have severe kidney issues, your doctor may reduce your dose of memantine.

Warnings

If you’re switching from the memantine immediate-release tablet or solution to the extended-release capsule, 5 mg twice per day of the immediate-release tablet or solution can be switched to 14 mg of the extended-release capsule the next day. Also, 10 mg twice per day of the immediate-release tablet or solution can be switched to 28 mg of the extended-release capsule.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs affect each person differently, we cannot guarantee that this list includes all possible dosages. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always to speak with your doctor or pharmacist about dosages that are right for you. Important considerations for taking this drug

You can crush or cut the immediate-release tablet

See Details

Store this drug at room temperature

See Details

Prescription is refillable

Travel

See Details

Clinical monitoring

See Details

Not every pharmacy stocks this drug, so call ahead

Insurance

See Details

Are there any alternatives?

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