L-Caine

Name: L-Caine

L-Caine Overview

Lidocaine is a prescription medication used to prevent pain before procedures or to relieve pain due to certain conditions. Lidocaine belongs to a group of drugs called local anesthetics. These stop nerves from sending pain signals to the brain.

This medication comes in several topical forms, including a patch to be applied to the skin (transdermal), ointment, cream, and oral solution. Lidocaine is an ingredient in some over-the-counter topical pain relievers. This page refers to the prescription forms of lidocaine.

This medication is also available in an injectable form to be given directly into a vein (IV) or for infiltration and nerve block by a healthcare professional.

Common side effects of topical lidocaine include irritation at site of application. Common side effects of injectable lidocaine include confusion, nervousness, and numbness. Lidocaine may also cause dizziness and drowsiness. Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how this medication affects you. 

Side Effects of L-Caine

Serious side effects have been reported with lidocaine. See the “Lidocaine Precautions” section.

Topical:

Common side effects of topical lidocaine include irritation at site of application, including burning, blisters, bruising, redness, or swelling at the site of application. Lidocaine ointment, gel, and cream, as well as the oral solution, may also cause vomiting, seizures, ringing in the ears, and irregular heartbeat. Lidocaine ophthalmic gel may cause headache or bloodshot eyes.

Lidocaine may also cause dizziness and drowsiness. Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how this medication affects you. 

Injectable:

Common side effects of injectable lidocaine include confusion, nervousness, numbness, blurred vision, irregular heartbeat, vomiting, seizures, ringing in the ears, headache, and shivering.

This is not a complete list of lidocaine side effects. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

L-Caine Precautions

Topical:

Serious side effects have been reported with topical lidocaine including the following:

Allergic reactions. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have some or all of the following symptoms of an allergic reaction.

  • Difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • Swelling of the face, throat, tongue, lips, eyes, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs
  • Hives or skin rash
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Fast breathing
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Confusion
  • Weakness
  • Fainting
  • Seizures or convulsions

Injectable:

Serious side effects have been reported with injectable lidocaine including the following:

Allergic reactions. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have some or all of the following symptoms of an allergic reaction.

  • Difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • Swelling of the face, throat, tongue, lips, eyes, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs
  • Hives or skin rash
  • Fast pulse
  • Fast breathing
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Confusion
  • Weakness
  • Fainting
  • Seizures or convulsions

Injectable lidocaine may also affect the central nervous system, including lightheadedness, nervousness, blurred or double vision, altered sensations, and changes in respiration.

Injectable lidocaine may also affect the cardiovascular system, including changes in heartbeat, decreased blood pressure, and cardiac arrest.

Lidocaine can cause drowsiness and dizziness. Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how lidocaine affects you.

Do not take lidocaine if you:

  • are allergic to lidocaine or to any of its ingredients
  • are allergic to other local anesthetics, including bupivacaine (Marcaine), etidocaine (Duranest), mepivacaine (Carbocaine, Prolocaine), or prilocaine (Citanest)

Additionally, do not take injectable lidocaine if you:

  • have Stokes-Adams syndrome or Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome
  • have sinoatrial, atrioventricular, or intraventricular block

L-Caine Food Interactions

Medications can interact with certain foods. In some cases, this may be harmful and your doctor may advise you to avoid certain foods. In the case of lidocaine, there are no specific foods that you must exclude from your diet when receiving this medication.

L-Caine and Pregnancy

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

The FDA categorizes medications based on safety for use during pregnancy. Five categories - A, B, C, D, and X, are used to classify the possible risks to an unborn baby when a medication is taken during pregnancy.

Lidocaine falls into category B.

There are no well-done studies that have been done in humans with lidocaine. In animal studies, pregnant animals were given this medication, and the babies did not show any medical issues related to this medication.

What is the most important information I should know about L-Caine (lidocaine injection)?

You should not receive this medicine if you have severe heart block, or a heart rhythm disorder called Stokes-Adams syndrome or Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome.

What should I avoid after receiving L-Caine (lidocaine injection)?

Lidocaine injection can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Unless absolutely necessary, do not drive after receiving this medicine.

Avoid eating or chewing within 1 hour after lidocaine injection is used to numb your mouth or throat. You may have trouble swallowing which could lead to choking. You may also accidentally bite the inside of your mouth if you are still numb an hour after treatment with lidocaine injection.

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to lidocaine: compounding powder, injectable solution, intravenous solution

General

Adverse reactions following administration of this drug are similar in nature to those observed with other amide local anesthetic agents. The most serious adverse reactions tend to be systemic in nature. In general, these adverse reactions are dose-related and may result from high plasma levels caused by excessive dosage, rapid absorption, or inadvertent intravascular injection, or may result from a hypersensitivity, idiosyncrasy, or diminished tolerance on the part of the patient.[Ref]

Cardiovascular

Frequency not reported: Bradycardia, hypotension, cardiovascular collapse, cardiac arrest, circulatory collapse, hypertension, arrhythmia, maternal hypotension, shock, tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, heart block, myocardial depression, peripheral vasodilation[Ref]

Nervous system

Frequency not reported: Lightheadedness, headache, dizziness, drowsiness, cold/numbness, tremor, convulsions, unconsciousness, positional headache, peripheral nerve symptoms, spinal cord deficit, paresthesia, speech slurred, arachnoiditis, peripheral nerve injury, coma, paralysis of the lower extremities, cauda equina syndrome, Horner's syndrome, hemiparesis, circumoral paresthesia, nystagmus[Ref]

Gastrointestinal

Frequency not reported: Vomiting, nausea, bowel control loss, swallowing difficult, numbness of tongue[Ref]

Psychiatric

Frequency not reported: Nervousness, apprehension, euphoria, confusion, agitation, disorientation, psychosis, restlessness, excitement[Ref]

Hematologic

Frequency not reported: Methemoglobinemia[Ref]

Dermatologic

Frequency not reported: Urticaria, cutaneous lesion, dermatitis, rash, angioedema, face edema[Ref]

Genitourinary

Frequency not reported: Bladder control loss, sexual function loss, perineal sensation loss, urinary retention[Ref]

Immunologic

Frequency not reported: Allergic reaction, anaphylaxis/anaphylactoid reaction[Ref]

Local

Frequency not reported: Persistent anesthesia[Ref]

Metabolic

Frequency not reported: Hypoglycemia[Ref]

Musculoskeletal

Frequency not reported: Twitching, backache, leg pain, buttock pain[Ref]

Ocular

Frequency not reported: Blurred/doubled vision, diplopia, transient amaurosis, bilateral amaurosis[Ref]

Other

Frequency not reported: Tinnitus, feeling hot, edema, shiver, total spinal block, hyperacusis, weakness, sphincter control loss[Ref]

Respiratory

Frequency not reported: Respiratory depression, respiratory arrest, dyspnea, bronchospasm, hypoventilation, apnea, respiratory inadequacy, respiratory failure, yawning[Ref]

Some side effects of L-Caine may not be reported. Always consult your doctor or healthcare specialist for medical advice. You may also report side effects to the FDA.

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