Immune Globulin Injection (Subcutaneous)

Name: Immune Globulin Injection (Subcutaneous)

What are some things I need to know or do while I take Immune Globulin Injection?

  • Tell all of your health care providers that you take immune globulin injection. This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.
  • If you have a latex allergy, talk with your doctor.
  • Talk with your doctor before getting any vaccines. Use with this medicine may either raise the chance of an infection or make the vaccine not work as well.
  • Have blood work checked as you have been told by the doctor. Talk with the doctor.
  • This medicine may affect certain lab tests. Tell all of your health care providers and lab workers that you take immune globulin injection.
  • This medicine is made from human plasma (part of the blood) and may have viruses that may cause disease. This medicine is screened, tested, and treated to lower the chance that it carries an infection. Talk with the doctor.
  • If you are 65 or older, use this medicine with care. You could have more side effects.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan on getting pregnant. You will need to talk about the benefits and risks of using immune globulin injection while you are pregnant.
  • Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding. You will need to talk about any risks to your baby.

What are some side effects that I need to call my doctor about right away?

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Signs of kidney problems like unable to pass urine, change in how much urine is passed, blood in the urine, or a big weight gain.
  • Fever or chills.
  • Change in color of skin to a bluish color like on the lips, nail beds, fingers, or toes.
  • Feeling very tired or weak.
  • Seizures.
  • Bloating.
  • Feeling confused.
  • Swelling.
  • Very bad dizziness or passing out.
  • A heartbeat that does not feel normal.
  • Any unexplained bruising or bleeding.
  • Mood changes.
  • Muscle or joint pain.
  • Change in speech.
  • Change in eyesight.
  • Blurred eyesight.
  • Shakiness.
  • Sweating a lot.
  • Very bad belly pain.
  • Dark urine or yellow skin or eyes.
  • Very bad irritation where the shot was given.
  • Lung problems have happened with this medicine. Call your doctor right away if you have lung or breathing problems like trouble breathing, shortness of breath, or a cough that is new or worse.
  • This medicine may raise the chance of a very bad brain problem called aseptic meningitis. Call your doctor right away if you have a headache, fever, chills, very upset stomach or throwing up, stiff neck, rash, bright lights bother your eyes, feeling sleepy, or feeling confused.

What are some other side effects of Immune Globulin Injection?

All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

  • Irritation where immune globulin injection is given.
  • Headache.
  • Loose stools (diarrhea).
  • Feeling tired or weak.
  • Back pain.
  • Sore throat.
  • Stuffy nose.
  • Dizziness.
  • Flushing.
  • Cramps.
  • Upset stomach or throwing up.
  • Belly pain.

These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your doctor. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. You may also report side effects at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch.

If OVERDOSE is suspected

If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

How do I store and/or throw out Immune Globulin Injection?

  • Most of the time, this medicine will be given in a hospital or doctor's office. If stored at home, follow how to store as you were told by the doctor.
  • Do not freeze.
  • Keep all drugs in a safe place. Keep all drugs out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Check with your pharmacist about how to throw out unused drugs.
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