Ibuprofen Oral Drops

Name: Ibuprofen Oral Drops

Uses of Ibuprofen Oral Drops

  • It is used to ease pain, swelling, and fever.
  • It is used to ease painful period (menstrual) cycles.
  • It is used to treat arthritis.
  • It may be given to you for other reasons. Talk with the doctor.

What are some things I need to know or do while I take Ibuprofen Oral Drops?

  • Tell all of your health care providers that you take this medicine (ibuprofen oral drops). This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.
  • Have your blood work checked if you are on this medicine for a long time. Talk with your doctor.
  • High blood pressure has happened with drugs like this one. Have your blood pressure checked as you have been told by your doctor.
  • Talk with your doctor before you drink alcohol.
  • If you smoke, talk with your doctor.
  • If you have asthma, talk with your doctor. You may be more sensitive to this medicine (ibuprofen oral drops).
  • You may bleed more easily. Be careful and avoid injury. Use a soft toothbrush and an electric razor.
  • The chance of heart failure is raised with the use of drugs like this one. In people who already have heart failure, the chance of heart attack, having to go to the hospital for heart failure, and death is raised. Talk with the doctor.
  • The chance of heart attack and heart-related death is raised in people taking drugs like this one after a recent heart attack. People taking drugs like this one after a first heart attack were also more likely to die in the year after the heart attack compared with people not taking drugs like this one. Talk with the doctor.
  • If you are taking aspirin to help prevent a heart attack, talk with your doctor.
  • This medicine may affect how much of some other drugs are in your body. If you are taking other drugs, talk with your doctor. You may need to have your blood work checked more closely while taking this medicine with your other drugs.
  • This medicine may raise the chance of a very bad brain problem called aseptic meningitis. Call your doctor right away if you have a headache, fever, chills, very upset stomach or throwing up, stiff neck, rash, bright lights bother your eyes, feeling sleepy, or feeling confused.
  • Liver problems have happened with drugs like this one. Sometimes, this has been deadly. Call the doctor right away if your child has signs of liver problems like dark urine, feeling tired, not hungry, upset stomach or stomach pain, light-colored stools, throwing up, or yellow skin or eyes.
  • If you are 60 or older, use this medicine (ibuprofen oral drops) with care. You could have more side effects.
  • NSAIDs like this medicine may affect egg release (ovulation) in women. This may cause you to not be able to get pregnant. This goes back to normal when this medicine (ibuprofen oral drops) is stopped. Talk with your doctor.
  • This medicine may cause harm to the unborn baby if you take it while you are pregnant. If you are pregnant or you get pregnant while taking this medicine, call your doctor right away.
  • Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding. You will need to talk about any risks to your baby.

What are some other side effects of Ibuprofen Oral Drops?

All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

  • Belly pain or heartburn.
  • Upset stomach or throwing up.
  • Hard stools (constipation).
  • Loose stools (diarrhea).
  • Gas.
  • Dizziness.

These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your doctor. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. You may also report side effects at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch.

How do I store and/or throw out Ibuprofen Oral Drops?

  • Store at room temperature.
  • Protect from light.
  • Store in a dry place. Do not store in a bathroom.
  • Keep all drugs in a safe place. Keep all drugs out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Check with your pharmacist about how to throw out unused drugs.

Consumer Information Use and Disclaimer

  • If your symptoms or health problems do not get better or if they become worse, call your doctor.
  • Do not share your drugs with others and do not take anyone else's drugs.
  • Keep a list of all your drugs (prescription, natural products, vitamins, OTC) with you. Give this list to your doctor.
  • Talk with the doctor before starting any new drug, including prescription or OTC, natural products, or vitamins.
  • Some drugs may have another patient information leaflet. Check with your pharmacist. If you have any questions about this medicine, please talk with your doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other health care provider.
  • If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

Review Date: October 4, 2017

(web3)