Ibuprofen Intravenous

Name: Ibuprofen Intravenous

Uses For ibuprofen

Ibuprofen injection is a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) that is used alone or together with other medicines (eg, opioid analgesics) to relieve mild to severe pain. It is also used to treat fever.

ibuprofen is to be given only by or under the supervision of your doctor.

Before Using ibuprofen

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For ibuprofen, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to ibuprofen or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of ibuprofen injection in children younger than 6 months of age. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of ibuprofen injection in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related kidney, liver, heart, or stomach problems, which may require an adjustment in the dose for patients receiving ibuprofen injection.

Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are receiving ibuprofen, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using ibuprofen with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

  • Ketorolac

Using ibuprofen with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Abciximab
  • Aceclofenac
  • Acemetacin
  • Acenocoumarol
  • Amiloride
  • Amineptine
  • Amitriptyline
  • Amitriptylinoxide
  • Amoxapine
  • Amtolmetin Guacil
  • Anagrelide
  • Apixaban
  • Ardeparin
  • Argatroban
  • Aspirin
  • Balsalazide
  • Bemiparin
  • Bendroflumethiazide
  • Benzthiazide
  • Betamethasone
  • Betrixaban
  • Bismuth Subsalicylate
  • Bivalirudin
  • Bromfenac
  • Budesonide
  • Bufexamac
  • Bumetanide
  • Cangrelor
  • Celecoxib
  • Certoparin
  • Chlorothiazide
  • Chlorthalidone
  • Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate
  • Choline Salicylate
  • Cilostazol
  • Citalopram
  • Clomipramine
  • Clonixin
  • Clopamide
  • Clopidogrel
  • Cortisone
  • Cyclopenthiazide
  • Cyclosporine
  • Dabigatran Etexilate
  • Dalteparin
  • Danaparoid
  • Deflazacort
  • Desipramine
  • Desirudin
  • Desmopressin
  • Desvenlafaxine
  • Dexamethasone
  • Dexibuprofen
  • Dexketoprofen
  • Diazoxide
  • Dibenzepin
  • Diclofenac
  • Diflunisal
  • Digoxin
  • Dipyridamole
  • Dipyrone
  • Dothiepin
  • Doxepin
  • Droxicam
  • Duloxetine
  • Edoxaban
  • Enoxaparin
  • Eplerenone
  • Epoprostenol
  • Eptifibatide
  • Escitalopram
  • Ethacrynic Acid
  • Etodolac
  • Etofenamate
  • Etoricoxib
  • Felbinac
  • Fenoprofen
  • Fepradinol
  • Feprazone
  • Feverfew
  • Floctafenine
  • Flufenamic Acid
  • Fluocortolone
  • Fluoxetine
  • Flurbiprofen
  • Fluvoxamine
  • Fondaparinux
  • Furosemide
  • Ginkgo
  • Gossypol
  • Heparin
  • Hydrochlorothiazide
  • Hydrocortisone
  • Hydroflumethiazide
  • Ibuprofen
  • Iloprost
  • Imipramine
  • Indapamide
  • Indomethacin
  • Ketoprofen
  • Lepirudin
  • Levomilnacipran
  • Lithium
  • Lofepramine
  • Lornoxicam
  • Loxoprofen
  • Lumiracoxib
  • Magnesium Salicylate
  • Meadowsweet
  • Meclofenamate
  • Mefenamic Acid
  • Melitracen
  • Meloxicam
  • Mesalamine
  • Methotrexate
  • Methyclothiazide
  • Methylprednisolone
  • Metolazone
  • Milnacipran
  • Morniflumate
  • Nabumetone
  • Nadroparin
  • Naproxen
  • Nefazodone
  • Nepafenac
  • Niflumic Acid
  • Nimesulide
  • Nimesulide Beta Cyclodextrin
  • Nortriptyline
  • Olsalazine
  • Opipramol
  • Oxaprozin
  • Oxyphenbutazone
  • Paramethasone
  • Parecoxib
  • Parnaparin
  • Paroxetine
  • Pemetrexed
  • Pentosan Polysulfate Sodium
  • Pentoxifylline
  • Phenindione
  • Phenprocoumon
  • Phenylbutazone
  • Phenyl Salicylate
  • Piketoprofen
  • Piroxicam
  • Polythiazide
  • Pralatrexate
  • Prasugrel
  • Prednisolone
  • Prednisone
  • Proglumetacin
  • Propyphenazone
  • Proquazone
  • Protein C
  • Protriptyline
  • Reboxetine
  • Reviparin
  • Rivaroxaban
  • Rofecoxib
  • Salicylamide
  • Salicylic Acid
  • Salsalate
  • Sertraline
  • Sibutramine
  • Sodium Salicylate
  • Spironolactone
  • Sulfasalazine
  • Sulindac
  • Tacrolimus
  • Tenoxicam
  • Tianeptine
  • Tiaprofenic Acid
  • Ticagrelor
  • Ticlopidine
  • Tinzaparin
  • Tirofiban
  • Tolfenamic Acid
  • Tolmetin
  • Torsemide
  • Treprostinil
  • Triamterene
  • Trichlormethiazide
  • Trimipramine
  • Trolamine Salicylate
  • Valdecoxib
  • Venlafaxine
  • Vilazodone
  • Vorapaxar
  • Vortioxetine
  • Warfarin
  • Xipamide

Using ibuprofen with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Acebutolol
  • Alacepril
  • Amikacin
  • Atenolol
  • Azilsartan
  • Azilsartan Medoxomil
  • Benazepril
  • Betaxolol
  • Bisoprolol
  • Candesartan
  • Captopril
  • Carteolol
  • Carvedilol
  • Celiprolol
  • Cilazapril
  • Delapril
  • Enalapril
  • Enalaprilat
  • Eprosartan
  • Esmolol
  • Fosinopril
  • Imidapril
  • Irbesartan
  • Labetalol
  • Levobunolol
  • Lisinopril
  • Losartan
  • Metipranolol
  • Metoprolol
  • Moexipril
  • Nadolol
  • Nebivolol
  • Olmesartan
  • Oxprenolol
  • Penbutolol
  • Pentopril
  • Perindopril
  • Pindolol
  • Practolol
  • Propranolol
  • Quinapril
  • Ramipril
  • Sotalol
  • Spirapril
  • Telmisartan
  • Temocapril
  • Timolol
  • Trandolapril
  • Valsartan
  • Zofenopril

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of ibuprofen. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Anemia or
  • Bleeding problems or
  • Congestive heart failure or
  • Dehydration or
  • Edema (fluid retention) or
  • Heart attack, recent or
  • Hyperkalemia (high potassium in the blood) or
  • Hypertension (high blood pressure) or
  • Hypovolemia (low blood volume) or
  • Kidney disease or
  • Liver disease or
  • Stomach ulcers or bleeding, history of or
  • Stroke, history of—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse.
  • Aspirin-sensitive asthma or
  • Aspirin sensitivity, history of—Should not be used in patients with these conditions.
  • Heart surgery (eg, coronary artery bypass graft [CABG])—Should not be used for pain right before or after surgery.
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)—May cause side effects to become worse.

Proper Use of ibuprofen

A nurse or other trained health professional will give you or your child ibuprofen in a hospital. ibuprofen is given through a needle placed in one of your veins.

Drink extra fluids so you will pass more urine while you are using ibuprofen. This will keep your kidneys working well and help prevent kidney problems.

Uses

Ibuprofen is used for the short-term treatment of mild to moderate pain in adults. When used with a narcotic (such as morphine) it may be used to treat moderate to severe pain. It is also used to reduce fever. This medication is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID).

How to use Ibuprofen Solution, Reconstituted (Recon Soln)

Read the Medication Guide provided by your pharmacist before you start using ibuprofen and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

If you are using this medication at home, read and learn all preparation and usage instructions from the manufacturer or from your health care professional. If you have any questions about using this medication properly, consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Before using, check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the liquid.

Follow your doctor's directions carefully. This medication is diluted and then given by injection into a vein for 30 minutes. When used to treat pain, it is usually injected every 6 hours as needed. When used to reduce fever, this drug may be injected every 4 to 6 hours as needed.

Learn how to store and discard needles and medical supplies safely. Consult your pharmacist for more details.

Drink plenty of fluids while using this medication unless your doctor tells you otherwise.

To reduce your risk of stomach bleeding and other side effects, use this medication at the lowest effective dose for the shortest possible time. Do not increase your dose, use it more frequently, or use it for a longer time than prescribed.

Remember that pain medications work best if they are used as the first signs of pain occur. If you wait until the pain has significantly worsened, the medicine may not work as well.

Tell your doctor if your pain or fever persists or worsens.

Interactions

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor's approval.

Some of the products that may interact with this drug include: aliskiren, ACE inhibitors (such as captopril, lisinopril), angiotensin II receptor blockers (such as losartan, valsartan), other medications for arthritis (such as aspirin, methotrexate), cidofovir, corticosteroids (such as prednisone), lithium, "water pills" (diuretics such as furosemide).

This medication may increase the risk of bleeding when used with other drugs that also may cause bleeding. Examples include anti-platelet drugs such as clopidogrel, "blood thinners" such as dabigatran/enoxaparin/warfarin, among others.

Check all prescription and nonprescription medicine labels carefully for other pain/fever drugs (aspirin, NSAIDs such as celecoxib, ketorolac, or naproxen). These drugs are similar to ibuprofen, so taking one of these drugs while also using ibuprofen may increase your risk of side effects. However, if your doctor has directed you to take low-dose aspirin for heart attack or stroke prevention (usually at dosages of 81-325 milligrams a day), you should continue taking the aspirin unless your doctor instructs you otherwise.

Daily use of ibuprofen may decrease aspirin's ability to prevent heart attack/stroke. Talk to your doctor about using a different medication (such as acetaminophen) to treat pain/fever. If you must use ibuprofen, talk to your doctor about possibly taking immediate-release aspirin (not enteric-coated/EC) while using ibuprofen. Use ibuprofen at least 8 hours before or at least 30 minutes after your aspirin dose. Do not increase your daily dose of aspirin or change the way you take aspirin/other medications without your doctor's approval.

(web3)