Dexamethasone (Intraocular Route)

Name: Dexamethasone (Intraocular Route)

Descriptions

Dexamethasone intravitreal implant is used to treat an eye disease called macular edema (swelling of the back of the eye). Macular edema occurs when a blood vessel in the eye is clogged. This causes vision changes that must be treated right away. Dexamethasone is a corticosteroid (steroid medicine) that helps reduce the swelling in the eye.

Dexamethasone intravitreal implant is also used to treat an eye disease called uveitis (swelling in the middle part of the eye). This medicine is also used to treat diabetic macular edema in patients with artificial lens implant or are scheduled for cataract surgery.

This medicine is to be given only by or under the supervision of your doctor.

This product is available in the following dosage forms:

  • Implant

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Drug Interactions

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are receiving this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

  • Artemether
  • Praziquantel
  • Rilpivirine
  • Rotavirus Vaccine, Live

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Aceclofenac
  • Acemetacin
  • Aldesleukin
  • Amtolmetin Guacil
  • Bemiparin
  • Boceprevir
  • Bosutinib
  • Bromfenac
  • Bufexamac
  • Bupropion
  • Celecoxib
  • Ceritinib
  • Choline Salicylate
  • Clarithromycin
  • Clonixin
  • Clozapine
  • Cobicistat
  • Conivaptan
  • Daclatasvir
  • Dasatinib
  • Dexibuprofen
  • Dexketoprofen
  • Diclofenac
  • Diflunisal
  • Dipyrone
  • Doxorubicin
  • Doxorubicin Hydrochloride Liposome
  • Droxicam
  • Efavirenz
  • Elvitegravir
  • Enzalutamide
  • Etodolac
  • Etofenamate
  • Etoricoxib
  • Etravirine
  • Felbinac
  • Fenoprofen
  • Fentanyl
  • Fepradinol
  • Feprazone
  • Floctafenine
  • Flufenamic Acid
  • Flurbiprofen
  • Fosamprenavir
  • Ibuprofen
  • Idelalisib
  • Indomethacin
  • Ixabepilone
  • Ketoprofen
  • Ketorolac
  • Lapatinib
  • Lornoxicam
  • Loxoprofen
  • Lumiracoxib
  • Meclofenamate
  • Mefenamic Acid
  • Meloxicam
  • Morniflumate
  • Nabumetone
  • Nadroparin
  • Naproxen
  • Nepafenac
  • Nevirapine
  • Nifedipine
  • Niflumic Acid
  • Nilotinib
  • Nimesulide
  • Nimesulide Beta Cyclodextrin
  • Nimodipine
  • Olaparib
  • Oxaprozin
  • Oxyphenbutazone
  • Parecoxib
  • Phenylbutazone
  • Piketoprofen
  • Piperaquine
  • Piroxicam
  • Pixantrone
  • Pranoprofen
  • Proglumetacin
  • Propyphenazone
  • Proquazone
  • Ritonavir
  • Rofecoxib
  • Romidepsin
  • Salicylic Acid
  • Salsalate
  • Saquinavir
  • Sodium Salicylate
  • Sulindac
  • Sunitinib
  • Tacrolimus
  • Telaprevir
  • Tenoxicam
  • Thalidomide
  • Tiaprofenic Acid
  • Ticagrelor
  • Tolfenamic Acid
  • Tolmetin
  • Valdecoxib
  • Vincristine Sulfate Liposome
  • Vortioxetine

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Alcuronium
  • Aminoglutethimide
  • Aprepitant
  • Aspirin
  • Atracurium
  • Balofloxacin
  • Besifloxacin
  • Caspofungin
  • Ciprofloxacin
  • Enoxacin
  • Fleroxacin
  • Fluindione
  • Flumequine
  • Fosaprepitant
  • Fosphenytoin
  • Gallamine
  • Gatifloxacin
  • Gemifloxacin
  • Hexafluorenium
  • Levofloxacin
  • Licorice
  • Lomefloxacin
  • Metocurine
  • Moxifloxacin
  • Nadifloxacin
  • Netupitant
  • Norfloxacin
  • Ofloxacin
  • Ospemifene
  • Pancuronium
  • Pazufloxacin
  • Pefloxacin
  • Phenobarbital
  • Phenytoin
  • Prulifloxacin
  • Rifampin
  • Rifapentine
  • Rufloxacin
  • Saiboku-To
  • Sparfloxacin
  • Tosufloxacin
  • Vecuronium
  • Warfarin

Other Interactions

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Detached retina (eye disorder) or
  • Endophthalmitis (inflammation of the eye) or
  • Glaucoma (increased pressure in the eye) or
  • Herpes infection of the eye, history of—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse.
  • Eye infection caused by a virus, fungus, or bacteria or
  • Eye lens problems (non-intact posterior lens capsule) or
  • Glaucoma, advanced—Should not be used in patients with these conditions.
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