Actisite

Name: Actisite

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

  • Actisite

Available Dosage Forms:

  • Powder for Suspension
  • Implant

Therapeutic Class: Antibacterial

Chemical Class: Tetracycline (class)

Usual Adult Dose for Acne

500 mg orally twice a day for 2 weeks or more, depending on the nature and severity of the infection

Usual Adult Dose for Bronchitis

500 mg orally every 6 hours for 7 to 10 days, depending on the nature and severity of the infection; may be given for 4 to 5 days a week during winter months as prophylaxis against chronic infectious bronchitis

Usual Adult Dose for Lyme Disease - Arthritis

500 mg orally every 6 hours for 14 to 30 days, depending on the nature and severity of the infection

Usual Adult Dose for Lyme Disease - Erythema Chronicum Migrans

500 mg orally every 6 hours for 10 to 30 days, depending on the nature and severity of the infection

Usual Adult Dose for Rickettsial Infection

500 mg orally every 6 hours for 7 days

Usual Adult Dose for Ornithosis

500 mg orally 4 times a day; initial treatment with IV doxycycline may be necessary for seriously ill patients
Duration: Treatment should continue at least 10 to 14 days after fever subsides to prevent relapse

Usual Adult Dose for Syphilis - Early

500 mg orally every 6 hours for 14 days; alternatively, 30 to 40 g in divided doses over a period of 10 to 15 days has been recommended

Tetracycline should be used only if penicillins are contraindicated.

Usual Adult Dose for Epididymitis - Sexually Transmitted

500 mg orally every 6 hours for 10 days

The patient's sexual partner(s) should also be evaluated/treated.

Doxycycline for 10 days, in conjunction with a single dose of a parenteral third-generation cephalosporin like ceftriaxone, has been specifically recommended by the CDC as primary treatment for sexually transmitted epididymitis. Tetracycline may be a reasonable substitute for doxycycline in this regimen.

Usual Adult Dose for Lymphogranuloma Venereum

Although tetracyclines in general may be useful for the treatment of lymphogranuloma venereum, doxycycline is much more commonly used and is specifically recommended by the CDC as primary therapy for this disease. Therefore, the use of tetracycline for the treatment of this patient with lymphogranuloma venereum is not recommended. Doxycycline may be an effective alternative.

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