Acetazolamide Tablets

Name: Acetazolamide Tablets

What are some side effects that I need to call my doctor about right away?

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Signs of too much acid in the blood (acidosis) like confusion; fast breathing; fast heartbeat; a heartbeat the does not feel normal; very bad stomach pain, upset stomach, or throwing up; feeling very sleepy; shortness of breath; or feeling very tired or weak.
  • Signs of electrolyte problems like mood changes, confusion, muscle pain or weakness, a heartbeat that does not feel normal, seizures, not hungry, or very bad upset stomach or throwing up.
  • Change in eyesight.
  • Change in hearing.
  • Ringing in ears.
  • A burning, numbness, or tingling feeling that is not normal.
  • Pain when passing urine or blood in urine.
  • Not able to pass urine or change in how much urine is passed.
  • Very bad and rarely deadly effects have happened with sulfa (sulfonamide) drugs like this one. These effects have included liver problems, blood problems, and very bad skin reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis). Call your doctor right away if you have a rash; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin; red or irritated eyes; sores in your mouth, throat, nose, or eyes; fever, chills, or sore throat; cough that is new or worse; feeling very tired or weak; any bruising or bleeding; or signs of liver problems like dark urine, feeling tired, not hungry, upset stomach or stomach pain, light-colored stools, throwing up, or yellow skin or eyes.

What are some other side effects of Acetazolamide Tablets?

All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

  • Upset stomach or throwing up.
  • Change in taste.
  • Loose stools (diarrhea).
  • Not hungry.
  • Blurred eyesight.
  • Feeling sleepy.
  • Feeling tired or weak.
  • Headache.

These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your doctor. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. You may also report side effects at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch.

How do I store and/or throw out Acetazolamide Tablets?

  • Store at room temperature.
  • Protect from light.
  • Store in a dry place. Do not store in a bathroom.
  • Keep all drugs in a safe place. Keep all drugs out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Check with your pharmacist about how to throw out unused drugs.

Rx Only DESCRIPTION

Acetazolamide, an inhibitor of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase is a white to faintly yellowish white crystalline, odorless powder, weakly acidic, very slightly soluble in water and slightly soluble in alcohol. The chemical name for acetazolamide is N-(5-Sulfamoyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)-acetamide and has the following chemical structure:

Molecular Weight: 222.25

Molecular Formula: C4H6N4 O3S2

Acetazolamide Tablets, USP are available for oral administration each containing 125 mg and 250 mg of acetazolamide respectively. Additionally, they contain the following inactive ingredients: lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, povidone, pregelatinized starch, sodium lauryl sulfate, and sodium starch glycolate.

Overdosage

No data are available regarding acetazolamide overdosage in humans as no cases of acute poisoning with this drug have been reported. Animal data suggest that acetazolamide is remarkably nontoxic. No specific antidote is known. Treatment should be symptomatic and supportive.

Electrolyte imbalance, development of an acidotic state, and central nervous effects might be expected to occur. Serum electrolyte levels (particularly potassium) and blood pH levels should be monitored.

Supportive measures are required to restore electrolyte and pH balance. The acidotic state can usually be corrected by the administration of bicarbonate.

Despite its high intraerythrocytic distribution and plasma protein binding properties, acetazolamide may be dialyzable. This may be particularly important in the management of acetazolamide overdosage when complicated by the presence of renal failure.

Description

Acetazolamide, an inhibitor of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase, is a white to faintly yellowish whitecrystalline, odorless powder, weakly acidic, very slightly soluble in water and slightly soluble in alcohol. The chemical name for acetaZOLAMIDE is N-(5-Sulfamoyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2yl)-acetamide and has the following structural formula:

Each tablet, for oral administration, contains 250 mg of acetaZOLAMIDE. In addition, each tablet contains the following inactive ingredients: lactose monohydrate, sodium starch glycolate, corn starch, and calcium stearate.

Indications

For adjunctive treatment of: edema due to congestive heart failure; drug-induced edema; centrencephalic epilepsies (petit mal, unlocalized seizures); chronic simple (open-angle) glaucoma, secondary glaucoma, and preoperatively in acute angle-closure glaucoma where delay of surgery is desired in order to lower intraocular pressure. AcetaZOLAMIDE is also indicated for the prevention or amelioration of symptoms associated with acute mountain sickness in climbers attempting rapid ascent and in those who are very susceptible to acute mountain sickness despite gradual ascent.

Side effects

Adverse reactions, occurring most often early in therapy, include paresthesias, particularly a “tingling” feeling in the extremities, hearing dysfunction or tinnitus, loss of appetite, taste alteration and gastrointestinal disturbances such as nausea, vomiting and diarrhea, polyuria, and occasional instances of drowsiness and confusion.

Metabolic acidosis and electrolyte imbalance may occur.

Transient myopia has been reported. This condition invariably subsides upon diminution or discontinuance of the medication. Other occasional adverse reactions include urticaria, melena, hematuria, glycosuria, hepatic insufficiency, flaccid paralysis, photosensitivity and convulsions. Also see PATIENT INFORMATION for possible reactions common to sulfonamide derivatives. Fatalities have occurred although rarely, due to severe reactions to sulfonamides including Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, fulminant hepatic necrosis, agranulocytosis, aplastic anemia and other blood dyscrasias (see WARNINGS).

Warnings

Fatalities have occurred, although rarely, due to severe reactions to sulfonamides including Stevens- Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, fulminant hepatic necrosis, agranulocytosis, aplastic anemia, and other blood dyscrasias. Sensitizations may recur when a sulfonamide is readministered irrespective of the route of administration. If signs of hypersensitivity or other serious reactions occur, discontinue use of this drug. Caution is advised for patients receiving concomitant high-dose aspirin and acetaZOLAMIDE, as anorexia, tachypnea, lethargy, coma and death have been reported.

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