A-Methapred

Name: A-Methapred

What are some things I need to know or do while I take A-methapred?

  • Tell all of your health care providers that you take this medicine. This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.
  • Have blood work checked as you have been told by the doctor. Talk with the doctor.
  • Have a bone density test as you have been told by your doctor. Talk with your doctor.
  • Have your eye pressure checked if you are on A-methapred for a long time. Talk with your doctor.
  • You may have more chance of getting an infection. Wash hands often. Stay away from people with infections, colds, or flu.
  • Chickenpox and measles can be very bad or even deadly in some people taking steroid drugs like this medicine. Avoid being near anyone with chickenpox or measles if you have not had these health problems before. If you have been exposed to chickenpox or measles, talk with your doctor.
  • This medicine may lower how much natural steroid is in your body. If you have a fever, an infection, surgery, or you are hurt, talk with your doctor. You may need extra doses of oral steroids. These extra steroids will help your body deal with these stresses. Carry a warning card saying that there may be times when you need extra steroids.
  • Long-term use may raise the chance of cataracts or glaucoma. Talk with the doctor.
  • This medicine may cause weak bones (osteoporosis) with long-term use. Talk with your doctor to see if you have a higher chance of weak bones or if you have any questions.
  • Talk with your doctor before getting any vaccines. Use with A-methapred may either raise the chance of an infection or make the vaccine not work as well.
  • If you have high blood sugar (diabetes), you will need to watch your blood sugar closely.
  • Talk with your doctor before you drink alcohol.
  • You may need to lower how much salt is in your diet and take extra potassium. Talk with your doctor.
  • If you are 65 or older, use this medicine with care. You could have more side effects.
  • This medicine may affect growth in children and teens in some cases. They may need regular growth checks. Talk with the doctor.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan on getting pregnant. You will need to talk about the benefits and risks of using A-methapred while you are pregnant.
  • Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding. You will need to talk about any risks to your baby.
  • Very bad health problems have happened when drugs like this one have been given into the spine (epidural). These include paralysis, loss of eyesight, stroke, and sometimes death. It is not known if drugs like this one are safe and effective when given into the spine. These drugs are not approved for this use. Talk with the doctor.
  • Some products have benzyl alcohol. Do not give a product that has benzyl alcohol in it to a newborn. Talk with the doctor to see if this product has benzyl alcohol in it.

What are some side effects that I need to call my doctor about right away?

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Signs of infection like fever, chills, very bad sore throat, ear or sinus pain, cough, more sputum or change in color of sputum, pain with passing urine, mouth sores, or wound that will not heal.
  • Signs of high blood sugar like confusion, feeling sleepy, more thirst, more hungry, passing urine more often, flushing, fast breathing, or breath that smells like fruit.
  • Signs of Cushing's disease like weight gain in the upper back or belly, moon face, very bad headache, or slow healing.
  • Signs of a weak adrenal gland like a very bad upset stomach or throwing up, very bad dizziness or passing out, muscle weakness, feeling very tired, mood changes, not hungry, or weight loss.
  • Signs of low potassium levels like muscle pain or weakness, muscle cramps, or a heartbeat that does not feel normal.
  • Signs of a pancreas problem (pancreatitis) like very bad stomach pain, very bad back pain, or very bad upset stomach or throwing up.
  • Feeling very tired, weak, or touchy; trembling; having a fast heartbeat, confusion, sweating, or dizziness if you missed a dose or recently stopped A-methapred (methylprednisolone injection).
  • Shortness of breath, a big weight gain, or swelling in the arms or legs.
  • Skin changes (pimples, stretch marks, slow healing, hair growth).
  • Chest pain or pressure.
  • Period (menstrual) changes.
  • Bone or joint pain.
  • Change in eyesight.
  • Change in the way you act.
  • Low mood (depression).
  • Seizures.
  • A burning, numbness, or tingling feeling that is not normal.
  • Any unexplained bruising or bleeding.
  • Very bad belly pain.
  • Black, tarry, or bloody stools.
  • Throwing up blood or throw up that looks like coffee grounds.

If OVERDOSE is suspected

If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

What Is A-Methapred?

Methylprednisolone is a steroid that prevents the release of substances in the body that cause inflammation.

Methylprednisolone is used to treat many different inflammatory conditions such as arthritis, lupus, psoriasis, ulcerative colitis, allergic disorders, gland (endocrine) disorders, and conditions that affect the skin, eyes, lungs, stomach, nervous system, or blood cells.

Methylprednisolone may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

You should not use methylprednisolone if you have a fungal infection anywhere in your body. Methylprednisolone injection should not be given to a premature baby.

You should not use methylprednisolone if you are allergic to it, or if you have a fungal infection anywhere in your body. Methylprednisolone injection should not be given to a premature baby.

Methylprednisolone can weaken your immune system, making it easier for you to get an infection. Steroids can also worsen an infection you already have, or reactivate an infection you recently had. Tell your doctor about any illness or infection you have had within the past several weeks.

To make sure methylprednisolone is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • heart disease, high blood pressure;
  • kidney disease;
  • cirrhosis or other liver disease;
  • past or present tuberculosis;
  • glaucoma or cataracts;
  • herpes infection of the eyes;
  • seizures, epilepsy or recent head injury;
  • stomach ulcers, ulcerative colitis, diverticulitis, or recent intestinal surgery;
  • a parasite infection that causes diarrhea (pinworms, or threadworms);
  • a thyroid disorder;
  • osteoporosis or low bone mineral density (steroid medication can increase your risk of bone loss);
  • depression or mental illness;
  • a muscle disorder such as myasthenia gravis;
  • an electrolyte imbalance (such as low levels of potassium or magnesium in your blood);
  • high levels of calcium in the blood related to cancer (also called hypercalcemia of malignancy);
  • if you use insulin or oral diabetes medication; or
  • if you take aspirin on a daily basis or at high doses.

It is not known whether methylprednisolone will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication.

It is not known whether methylprednisolone passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Steroids can affect growth in children. Talk with your doctor if you think your child is not growing at a normal rate while using this medication.

Do not give this medicine to a child (especially a baby) without medical advice.

A-Methapred Side Effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • blurred vision, tunnel vision, eye pain, or seeing halos around lights;
  • shortness of breath (even with mild exertion), swelling, rapid weight gain;
  • severe depression, changes in personality, unusual thoughts or behavior;
  • new or unusual pain in an arm or leg or in your back;
  • bloody or tarry stools, coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds;
  • a seizure (convulsions); or
  • low potassium--leg cramps, constipation, irregular heartbeats, fluttering in your chest, increased thirst or urination, numbness or tingling, muscle weakness or limp feeling.

Common side effects may include:

  • headache;
  • mild muscle pain or weakness; or
  • stomach discomfort, bloating.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Why is this medication prescribed?

Methylprednisolone injection is used to treat severe allergic reactions. Methylprednisolone injection is used in the management of multiple sclerosis (a disease in which the nerves do not function properly), lupus (a disease in which the body attacks many of its own organs), gastrointestinal disease, and certain types of arthritis. Methylprednisolone injection is also used to treat certain conditions that affect the blood, skin, eyes, nervous system, thyroid, kidneys, and lungs. It is sometimes used in combination with other medications to treat symptoms of low corticosteroid levels (lack of certain substances that are usually produced by the body and are needed for normal body functioning). Methylprednisolone injection is in a class of medications called corticosteroids. It works to treat people with low levels of corticosteroids by replacing steroids that are normally produced naturally by the body. It also works to treat other conditions by reducing swelling and redness and by changing the way the immune system works.

How should this medicine be used?

Methylprednisolone injection comes as powder to be mixed with liquid to be injected intramuscularly (into a muscle) or intravenously (into a vein). It also comes as a suspension for injection to be injected intramuscularly, intra-articularly (into a joint), or intralesionally (into a lesion). Your personal dosing schedule will depend on your condition and on how you respond to treatment.

You may receive methylprednisolone injection in a hospital or medical facility, or you may be given the medication to use at home. If you will be using methylprednisolone injection at home, your healthcare provider will show you how to inject the medication. Be sure that you understand these directions, and ask your healthcare provider if you have any questions. Ask your healthcare provider what to do if you have any problems using methylprednisolone injection.

Your doctor may change your dose of methylprednisolone injection during your treatment to be sure that you are always using the lowest dose that works for you. Your doctor may also need to change your dose if you experience unusual stress on your body such as surgery, illness, or infection. Tell your doctor if your symptoms improve or get worse or if you get sick or have any changes in your health during your treatment.

In case of emergency/overdose

In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at 911.

US Brand Name

  1. A-Methapred
  2. Depo-Medrol
  3. SoluMEDROL

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

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